Education: B.S., Oakland University

My Philosophy: Lean into the tough stuff, do the things that scare you the most –they will make you a better leader and human being. Be authentic and vulnerable in your work, learn from experience and be confident, but humble. You’ll encounter plenty of people who may question your value, don’t be one of them. You can’t lead change from the fence – leadership is a full contact sport. Be provocative, flexible and willing to do things differently. If you don’t get the results you are looking for, try something new, never accept the status quo.


Shaun Ellen Zitting 

Vice President, Human Resources & Communications, Performance Materials and Technology

award winner

Vice president of human resources and communications for Honeywell Performance Materials and Technologies (PMT), an $8 billion growth engine and a leader in the global energy sector, Shaun Zitting combines decades of experience with a relentless drive to get results. She loathes the status quo, welcomes tough challenges and is sought out by senior executives for her perspective and advice. She has significantly improved the way Honeywell thinks about diversity, talent acquisition and retention.

Zitting lectures frequently and has been recognized for innovative thinking and problem solving by Computerworld and Human Resources Executive magazine.

Originally from Traverse City, Michigan, Zitting now lives in Denville, New Jersey, with her wife Kris, three rescue dogs and two rescue cats. The couple are active supporters of several nonprofit and academic organizations, including animal rescues.

“When you put people together with different perspectives and backgrounds,” says Zitting, “they will invariably create something better than people who think, look and act the same. If you get it right, diversity can be a huge business differentiator.” She continues, “It’s simple. The best people in any field come from all over the world – from different religions, political views, socioeconomic backgrounds, race, gender, sexual orientation, working preferences, values ‒ If you don’t believe this, you will miss out on attracting and keeping the best people.”

Asked about obstacles she has faced in her own career, Zitting has this to say: “I probably thought they were my fault – something I should have done better. I think other women in business take more responsibility for ‘what’s not working’ than they own. I’ve learned not to personalize problems. I have a ‘never give up, bring it on’ attitude, I don’t let them see me sweat and, if all else fails, I have a glass of really good wine (after work, of course)!”

Zitting offers women this wisdom, “Forget the ‘why’ of why things are the way they are; just aspire to be better than you are today and, over time, you will be in front! No one promised life would be fair, it’s not. Put on your big girl pants and kick some butt.”